TWO PERTURBING CRATERS
IN A TRANQUIL SEA


SEARCHING FOR SIGNS

    Most searches for signs of artificial structures on the Moon are for structures rising above the surface. If structures were built on the Moon, it would seem likely that large sections of them would be built below the surface. Given the proposed age (millions of years) of such structures, it would seem likely that some collapse would have occurred for the underground sections.

   One part of our search has been for signs of collapse, particularly if the collapse features have unusual characteristics, such as regular or geometric structure. Basically we have been looking for anything which might not fit well into the accepted theories for natural formation on the Moon.

   The Moon does indeed have natural collapse features, as well as natural dome-shaped features. The trick is not merely to find the unusual, but not to mistake the normal as unusual. When we find what seems to us to be an unusual feature, we first examine possible natural explanations of our own, no matter how unlikely they might seem. If we can arrive at not even an unlikely explanation, we then try to find references to and explanations for such features in the appropriate texts. It was while studying a book called "Moon Morphology" that we began finding features or surface effects which had even the experts scratching their heads.

  One place which has such features is in the Sea of Tranquility, coincidentally about eighty miles from the Apollo 11 landing site. Here are a series of shallow depressions with very subdued rims, if any. Some of these depressions are one-quarter of a mile across. Among these depressions are two craters with some very strange debris.

  Both craters are seen together in this image. The circled  crater in the upper left corner is the unnamed half-mile wide crater that was first presented here. The large crater is the two-mile wide Arago C, the latest area of interest. These craters are approximately three miles apart. Arago C has a larger field of debris and some features at a considerably larger scale than is seen in the first crater. Arago C has other notable differences as well. Note the pronounced raised rim and indications of ejecta and secondary impacts. Unlike the first crater, this one has all the signs of an impact crater and none of the signs of a collapse feature.

THE FIRST CRATER        ARAGO C        THE LUNAR ORBITER SPACECRAFT

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Author: MikeLomax@aol.com                                                VGL